About your Search

20130104
20130112
STATION
CNBC 14
CSPAN 6
CNNW 5
CSPAN2 4
KQED (PBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBCW 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
shift products that are vital to our way of life. be abundant and affordable supplies of energy from shale oil both natural gas and oil are driving job creation and economic growth clear across the country. .. producing more domestic energy provides opportunity for the u.s. to increase exports and serve new market. the recent new economic consulting study from the department of energy concludes an exporting is a net benefit in all scenarios evaluated and more exports increase those benefits. just a few years ago, as we all know, we were considering lmj terminals to import natural gas to the united states. what a difference a few short years make. by developing new technology to access potential new sources like oil shale, which often goes not talked about, we will be able to dramatically increase our energy potential and role as the global energy leader. oil shale in the western united today is estimated at 800 billion barrels, which is nearly three times the proven oil reserve of saudi arabia. as the numbers clearly show, we in the industry are investing in america's future. an
gerard says energy is fundamental to america's future, and more domestic production only translates into more economic growth, jobs and government revenue. his comments came during the apis annual state of energy address tuesday here in washington, d.c. after his remarks mr. gerard took part in a q&a session with the audience and members of the press. this is about an hour 18 minutes. >> thank you, marty, and thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for being here today. we are honored by your presence, and greatly appreciate your participation. happy new year to each one of you. and i look around the room, i see a number of distinguished guests. in washington everyone is distinguished, as we all know, and we would like to take the time to introduce everyone. however, in the interest of time we can do that today. though knowing as i look at many of you here today, knowing that many of you have a key role in the energy policy debate, and hopefully what might happen over the next year or two as we consider the truly game changing opportunity we have here in the united states, as it relates to
look at many of you here today, knowing many of you have a key role in energy policy today, and hopefully what might happen over the next year or two as we consider the truly game changing opportunity we have here in the united states as it relates to energy. before i proceed and share remarks with you, i would like to introduce our friends at the head table today. i would like to begin with a new great cheerleader of energy that has come to the united states senate from the state of north dakota. senator, would you stand, please? [laughter] [applause] i think i finally found someone who is a bigger cheerleader than i am. we look forward to working with you. she is truly an expert in the area of oil and natural gas. she has been the tax commissioner and the state attorney general. she knows the industry well. let me quickly go around and introduce others. walter, if you would please stand. walt is the general president of the iron workers union. let me introduce doug. he is the president of the united brotherhood of carpenters heard we work closely. we have 15 unions now. t
or unearthing the energy potential? passions run hot on both sides of this one. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea why dawn was gone for so long... ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her leave again. iams. keep love strong. a great cup of coffee should be easy as one, two... well, just one. new single serve cafe collections from maxwell house now available for use in the keurig k-cup brewer. always good to the last drop. >>> if you sign this lease, we get the rights to drill on your land. >> there's no reason the town shouldn't have a state of the art high school. >> what kind of money are you talking about? >> you could be a millionaire. >> this town, this life, it's dying. you all see it coming and you just don't get out of the way. >> we're not fighting for land, steve. we are fighting for people. >> save the local eco
with this energy boom and things going on in housing and maybe manufacturing. we did see in this report some gains in construction. we saw gains in manufacturing. what's your sense? what do you make of this report? >> well, the construction and manufacturing, some was sandy related and some housing related. the only real bright spart was residential construction. that's where the real bang for the dollar is in terms of jobs. that's the place we need to see come back. we continue to see, though, some losses in educational employment at the state and local level and retirees in the postal sector. we have yet to see cutbacks in postal -- the budget for the post office so, that will be a bigger head wind down the road. but we are seeing retirees come out there. the public sector still a drag on the overall numbers. i also think it's important on the health care industry where the surprise on the upside was in nursing and in nursing homes, basically, people -- the 80 and over demographic are the fastest growing demographic today. so you're starting to see that filter through and the contour of the jobs
and there is energy the in that unity. that is new york at its best. that is new york fulfilling its potential. that is new york fulfilling the dream. that is new york the laboratory of the american experiment of democracy. that is new york honoring the lady in the harbor, the statue of liberty who holds the torch and says you are all invited. i don't care the color of your skin or how much money you have in your pocket. you come here and we will invest in you, work with you, and we want you to do well. we'll educate you. we'll give you health care because we believe in community. we believe when you are raised we are all raised. that is new york at its finest. so my friends, what is the state of new york state? the state of new york state is that new york state is rising. new york state is rising because it's more unified than ever before. new york state is rising to build back better and stronger than ever before. new york state is rising to build a smarter, stronger state than we ever had before. new york state is rising with a passion and a commitment to make this state better than it's ev
't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer >> okay. why equityholders might do pregnant or are breastfeeding,e should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breat
these four schools. each exhibits a new energy and renewed sense of purpose and more schools are lining up to be transformed in the years ahead. of course, reform could not be complete without supporting our teachers. they have dedicated their lives to our children. for the first time in a very long time, we're dedicating new resources for them as well. we know success is possible. we have seen it paired with a cooperative effort where every voices heard, we are going to replicate it in classes around our state. the bottom line is, students will be better prepared for school today and for the job market tomorrow. [applause] when it came to energy, our state had been a national leader for years in the worst possible way. we had the highest electric rates in the continental united states. rates that are squeezing the budgets of families and businesses. we came together and decided we needed a plan to take these problems head on. we realized our economic, environmental, and economic needs were all related, and that the path we chose would impact our economy in the state for years to come. con
, untenable energy costs, and natural disasters the likes of which our generation had never seen. and then, in december, just when we thought the worst had happened -- it actually did. the people of connecticut, the communities you represent, and all of us in this chamber when tested, we met those challenges head on. we did as our forefathers did, as our grandparents and parents taught us. we dug in. we banded together. we decided to focus not on what makes us different, but on what makes us the same our common humanity. it is this core strength and spirit of community that brought us together to accomplish so much on behalf of the people of connecticut. two years ago, we faced the single largest per-capita deficit in the nation. it was a problem decades in the making. we knew that getting our fiscal house in order was critical to creating jobs. connecticut employers needed a responsible and predictable partner in state government. we came together and passed a balanced budget. we cut more than we added in new revenue. and even after revenues came in short as they did in 31 other states
hate it when you say that. but look, bonds offer very little value. i use lindco and lind energy as an example. versus some of the real estate investment trusts. medical and health care. there's a lot of bond alternatives. you don't have to be stopped. >> even a dividend yielder like j & j. >> j & j is so undervalued. stock up 7% to 8% last year? with a stroke of a pen they could get that stock to 80, just by breaking it up. put together by someone who, frankly, i know is revered, weldon. there's no reference here for it. >> what is the ten-year -- what is the yield on the ten-year have to get to before we decide that the great rotation is in the midst of happening from bonds to stocks? >> i would have told you when a dividend -- >> now? >> when we thought the tax was going to go to 40%, i would have said, you know, it goes up a half a percent, that's fine. but look, dividends were preserved. we never talk about how big that was, the dividend -- >> enormous. >> it's led to a lot of buying in the last few days. people said, oh, i've got to sell those stocks. even the worst ones ha
call. we've been talking about the energy space and gotten tremendous pubback from many clients on the interest there, but it's generally one of the last cyclical areas investors rotate into. there's opportunity here between now and going into the middle of q2. >> we'll watch energy. thank you for that. make us some money. guys, thank you very much. see you soon. have a good weekend. >> appreciate that. >> notable ipos on next week's agenda as well and bob pisani has the lowdown on that angle. hey, bob. >> quiet recently, but next week we'll get a brand name. take a look at this, norwegian cruise lines, believe it or not, third biggest cruise operator in neckor america, going to be a $400 million deal. this will be a nice one to watch. it will be in the middle of next week. a lot of interest in master limited partnerships. three of them coming next week. they are back by physical assets that generate revenue. in fact, very nice dividend yields. take a look. sun coke energy, 8.25% yield here. next one here, take a look at cvr refining, petroleum refining operations in kansas and
. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on tax reform, entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was on
demand is growing, the oil price may act as a break in the world economy. the energy revolution will have a global impact in oil flows toward asia. and the global shift is underpinned by huge energy investments. we are going to be talking about u.s. energy. >> yeah -- exactly. we're also seeing reports about how u.s. oil import will be at the lowest in 25 years. there is a change afoot. >> i guess that's what the iea head is saying, asia is going to take more of the u.s. demand. >>> to earnings. yes, alcoa swung to a fourth quarter profit matching forecasts. results were helped by stabilizing raw aluminum prices. higher prices and cost cutting. revenues down 1.5% to $5.9 billion. that did beat estimates. alcoa is also slightly boosting its 2013 global demand forecast from 6.5% to 7%. kleinfeld says growth in china is coming back and europe is doing better than expected. the stock up 1.3% in after hours. in frankfurt, up 1.72%. join for the first hour, for the first time this year, charlie diebel. hello. good to see you. right. here we are. we've kicked off earnings season. what do you mak
, quirky and fun. >> talking about new things, new ways that you're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented the new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the
energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32, it will go to 33. it ran to $35.40, and the group got ahead of itself. but remember, this is a temporary problem. you have millions of people coming on air every day saying, the fed's going to have to raise rates. if that's the case, wells fargo is your number one stock. >> meanwhile, is american express adding to what morgan stanley has done, what citi has done, and that is trimming their work force. in this case, you could probably argue by a more significant level, right? >> and for different reasons, yes. >> that's really the pressure from the digitization of the travel business as opposed to morgan stanley. the digits getting smaller and smaller in terms of the profit margins there. >> i was thinking, you know, i remember thinking taking trips with my father in the '70s, you couldn't travel around the world without american express travel
it was a turn in the housing market. it was cheap energy and an improvement in u.s. manufacturing. but nevertheless, i think you are seeing for fundamental reasons have pretty good strength in the u.s. >> well, that was jim's view. chris, what do you take away from the minutes yesterday? it had a big impact on the dollar, pushing benchmark yields higher, as well. i think we have to be contextualizing what comes out for minute statements compared with headlines. and i think that the real issue has been the fed has decided in the last six months to start actively talking about policy as part of the policy, if you like. it's the giving voice to what's going on. and we've heard a lot more from the fed about what it's anticipating doing in 2013/14. the idea that there's probably a relatively even balance, bear in mind we have new fed members coming in this year, there's a relatively even balance between people that think you should do more accommodate than not. it takes take away the weapons the fed was already working with until we saw the unemployment level coming down to the kind of
states, health care is something that our managers like. energy, more cyclical consumer discretionary leaning a little bit into a cyclical play. don't overshoot it but just lean too it. >> at the same time you guys are only looking for 1,500 on the s&p. we're at 1470 so between now and the end of the year. >> 0 point? >> looking for 30 more points on the s&p. >> coming into this year a lot of volatility is wrapped around that. saw that last year, a rally, pullback, rally, pullback and rally into the end of the year. high single sdajts reasonable expectations for someone having into this market, wrapped with a lot of volatility. get so much more, so much the better, but it will be a cheap ride in our opinion. >> we'll leave it there. gentlemen, thanks so much. great conversation. appreciate it. this market is gaining momentum as we approach the close. let's find out what's behind it from bob pisani. over to you, robert. >> you know what's important. put up the s&p 500, because we're about to close -- if we close at 1469 or so, five-year highs in the s&p, near historic highs, of course,
proponent of energy reform. mexico has a lot of potential it is not tapping at present. >> tom: we mentioned the price performance that the exchange rate had, outperformed the united states, and you think it can still continue to build on those gains. >> i think the u.s. needs to be there for mexico to outperform. as long as the u.s. economy keeps growing, mexico should keep growing. >> tom: so it is really the united states helping to pull mexico up? >> and mexican labor costs, when you adjust for productivity have been held flat over the next decade. china has seen its labor costs escalate, and the two have pretty close to met. so mexico is much more competitive on a cost basis, and it is here. >> tom: just across the border. finally, that brings us to the united states. how does the u.s. look compared to the rest of the world? >> i think we are still looking okay if we can get past this budget. >> tom: you're less excited about america than you are about non-japan asia. >> i'm really excited about non-japan asia because they're coming back from a period of out and out weakness. but i'm re
, energy and fixed income. 2012 a pretty rough one. 88% of them trailing the market, according to goldman sachs. . the average hedge fund posted a rough 6% gain last year, according to hedge fund research. >>> and the problems continue to pile up for boeing's dreamliner after an oil leak and a cracked cockpit window were discovered on two separate flights in japan today. the latest incidents come ahead of a scheduled press conference from the federal aviation administration and the u.s. department of transportation. that's scheduled for 9:30 eastern. the uf of a is expected to announce a review into the aircraft's power systems after several mishaps on tuesday. 787 at boston's logan airport leaked around 40 gallons of fuel on to the tarmac a day after another airplane caught fire in boston. boeing stock? i'm not sure we have it. don't worry about it. the we're looking at the three-month chart on the nikkei. up 25.65% in the last three months. up another 1.6% today. shinzo abe announcing another stimulus bill suggesting the bank of japan should maybe think about adopting an employment targ
. >> let's check out the latest moves in energy and metals. sharon. >> definitely about china when you're talking about most of the commodities an the momentum that we're seeing in the commodities sector today. we are looking at oil prices broken out above 94% a barrel for the wti contract and that is significant. the fact that we did see from china december oil imports up 8% and year over year we're seeing a rise of nearly 7%. that's what traders are looking at. but also saying wti is a bit overbought here. less momentum in the brent crude contract. metals, it is palladium and platinum once again help to go le helping to extend the gains based on what we're getting out of china. and gold and silver, they hit session highs after the e echle commentary. copper not as much of a gainer. momentum tapered off at the end of the year. melissa, back to you. >>> coming up, kick starting a smart watch. pebbles version is launching later this month. also ahead, herbalife fights back after michael johnson finishes addressing shareholders, he'll appear on "squawk on the street." take a look at this
she played little league baseball. >> she was a ball of energy. ball of life and she will be missed by us. every day. >>> alyssa treatment of becoming a firefighter-paramedic. they presented her with a patch. proceeds will go to the national center for missing and exploited children. >>> a man stabbed a cab driver last night outside the macarthur station. the incident began with an argument between a man and woman inside one of the trains. the woman got off the train with the man chasing after her. he followed her into the taxi. the cab driver tried to inter convenient and that's when he was stabbed. another cabbie took the cab driver to the hospital that was stabbed. no word on the woman involved. >>> a hitchhiker stabbed a man giving him a lift. it happened on river road. the victim had a child in his car when he picked up the hitchhiker. it is unclear why he was stabbed. but he was able to stop the car and throw the hitchhiker out. he was taken to the hospital with stab wounds and they are now searching for the hitchhiker. >>> this happened yesterday afternoon on gary street near
the wind energy tax credit. and even got the rates back to where he wanted to get the rates. now, we're in a divided government. you're not going to get every single thing that you want, but the president got some really big things, made some real progress. and if you look at the base line that everybody compares, you know, where the budget is to everything else, actually, this does cut the deficit by $737 billion. so i think the president made big progress here and we're going to have to see going forward how we're going to be able to deal with the looming crisis that we face in the next couple of months. >> bill burton has just shown why he was the deputy press secretary. and i mean that, bill, as a compliment. but, in all seriousness, he's giving the spin on that. so what do you say? >> well, i think that when you look at president obama's priorities, it's important to keep in mind that deficit reduction isn't necessarily his biggest priority right now, for the simple reason that there's a lot of anxiety among folks in the white house that if you have too fast of fiscal contractio
on the shale gas story. on the one hand, the u.s. is going to be totally self-sufficient on energy. people believe in shale gas. other people say that the rates are enormous and yet the oil price doesn't seem to be coming down because of it. which one is it? is it a genuine story or is it -- which one is it? >> it's always complicated, isn't it? i think it's a mix of things. on the gas side of thing, they've seen phenomenal growth. the problem is, oil is a slightly different story. but both the oil and decline rates are phenomenal after literally a few days, the decline rate goes down from 50% to 80%. so you need to keep trimming a huge number of rates. it's very, very expensive. i definitely don't buy the argument that the u.s. is going to be independent by an x number of dates, no. there are lots of problems. infrastructure is massively messed up at the moment. pipelines go another way, oil production going another way. refineries, heavy crude, lots of issues to deal with. i think in terms of why isn't lower gas prices impacting oil, gas and oil don't interact these days very much. oil i
this fracking thing going on which is the biggest thing happens in 50 years in the energy industry for lowering costs. i'm bullish. but china, they have to come to terms with their export dependsy. >> so you're tenured at ucor vine? >> i've been there for 25 years, joe. >> uc ervine? >> it's so hard, joe. you're having a real tough time there digging trenches. >> hey. we're in englewood, new jersey, buddy, so you've got nothing on that. >> been there, done that. i love the mothership. >> laguna is how far from you? >> i can't complain. i'm not complaining. >> you've got a lot of traffic. that's what i'm hanging my hat on. >> there you go. not at this time of morning. >> no. see you later. >> take care, man. >>> coming up, what do hedge funds and advertising agencies have in common? more than you think. how they're invading madison avenue. that and is more when we return. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of th
five years. but the concerns seem to be around things like infrastructure, energy policy and immigration and in particular, the general level of regulation. so what cfos are saying to us is what worries them are things more around the microsooidz side of the economy. >> business hasn't really come up with a view for that, hasn't it? >> we'll see what comes out of that. >> thank you for joining us. if you have any thoughts or comments, please e-mail us, worldwide@cnbc.com. >>> we're getting more details on japan's xlumtry budget. kitadai-san, hello. >> hello, ross. the government has compiled an outstanding for fiscal 2012 valued at more than $14 billion. the new liberal democratic led government plans to spend a large portion of the funds on public projects. the budget will focus on targets to introduce resistant construction standards at schools and hospitals, plus provide funds to repair aging roads and water pipes. the extra budget includes funds for ads 1.7 billion lending scheme to encourage firms to develop new technologies and pursue overseas m&a. the lending schem
, energy particularly in the service sector, places where even if you do get some disappointment on the consumption, are going to be worried about q1, that these companies still have the ability to outperform because they leverage a global growth, they're leveraged to emerging market. one other things that's suggested is looking at larger companies. i had a big rally in small caps last week, but the companies that are from the best positions are the mega and the large caps, not the small caps. >> if you're looking at big companies that are global companies, what are you talking about, a cisco or something? >> yaes. i think that's a good example. companies that are leveraged in infrastructure, companies not so dependent on that consumer wallet share. >> thank you very much for coming in today. >> thank you very much. >>> coming up, we're going to take a crip to the futures pits and check on the early action this morning. but first, check this out. mcdonald's changing its name in the land down under. for one month, mcdonald's restaurants are going to be renamed macas, a local nickn
, "shouldn't you have more energy than me? you're, like, eight!" [ male announcer ] for every 2 pounds you lose through diet and exercise alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. simple. effective. advantage: mom. let's fight fat with alli. learn more, lose more at letsfightfat.com. >>> days after the last house of representatives ignited a huge political fire storm refusing to vote on a $60 billion aid package both chambers of the new congress have approved a smaller $9.7 billion measure. the remaining $51 billion will be considered later this month. money is only one of the many challenges facing new york and new jersey in the wake of the storm. another major problem, two facilities housing thousands and thousands of barrels of evidence in criminal cases are damaged and it could take a huge toll on the courts. what is going on? >> there are some cases right now making their way through new york city courts where evidence can't be produced. it is unclear at this point how extensive a problem this is going to be in criminal trials. >> this flood damaged warehous
no serious effort to block energy from those from the persian gulf. it's because we've been there and we were there when saddam hussein invaded kuwait. i worry that the rebalancing may not be a rebalancing and may be a pivot as originally described and we will move from the middle east and, i can understand the desire to leave the terrible part of the world for people making problems there. i spent a good part of my career working in east asia. the one job you didn't mention, i think my favorite which was ambassador to indonesia. i loved the focus on asia. i think it's important. but unfortunately, the middle east county going -- isn't going leave us alone. i thought about the fact that americans are no or notoriously short memory except when it comes to our own civil wars. it has the great advantages. one cannot manage the french treating germany post world war ii the way they did. we're all better for it. we don't like vacations as much as the french probably do. we love vacation from history. we took one for twenty years after world world war i. it was probably the longest and we took one
the dialogue to change that discussion. do you want your children dodging bullets? many people look at energy and the consumption of our metal resources. this is important. it is not binding. -- unending. host: joseph ramirez adds this to the conversation -- the white house said the president will meet with hamid karzai on friday. josh ragan is on the phone with us to give us more details about these nominations. let's begin with the nomination of chuck hagel, why? guest: president obama has long been a friend of chuck hagel and they knew each other since 2007 when they served on the foreign relations committee. they traveled to iraq together in 2008 when president obama was just a candidate they have a similar war of view and agree on a lot of these issues. chuck hagel has been serving as president obama's intel is advisory board co-chair, they get along and obama can put someone in the office that agrees with him. he has a great personal relationship with him. host: what about the confirmation process? what is it looking like right now? articles are saying that there are about 10 senators w
activities of the department of energy is about $550 billion in 2013 according to the defense authorization pill that was just passed -- bill that was passed by congress. it just has limited significance this year since the appropriations which actually provide the money are being done on this ongoing p continuing resolution basis, and since sequestration is still a possibility in two months. but to give you a feel for that 550, 550 billion in the base budget, how does that compare to a couple of reference points? let me just give a couple, and i'm sure they'll come up in discussion. you can look at that number as being really big or modest, depending on your vantage point. historically in the cold war we averaged about $475 billion a year, and i've adjusted for inflation. these are all in 2013 dollars. so we're actually spending, still, substantially more in the base budget not even counting the war costs than we did for the cold war average. on the other hand, we're now down by 100 billion from where we had been just a couple years ago. largely because those war costs are coming down, and
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)